Do homes with swimming pools sell faster than homes without? As a buyer, I can't decide if it's an asset or liability.

Asked by Jena Beaver, Los Feliz, Los Angeles, CA Wed May 17, 2017

I'm also curious how much a pool really affects selling price--and whether someone might actually add property value by filling in a pool, gaining usable yard space.

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Answers

85
Eric And Sab…, Home Buyer, Palm Coast, FL
Thu Jun 22, 2017
I'm not a realtor however we retired in Florida and although a pool is a nice bonus we have found that being retired, it was not a plus. The upkeep, maintenance and additional costs like electric, water. .. We decided against it. It depends on where you live and who the area caters to. Unless you have money to burn, it adds little. .. The pool homes here where we looked were cheaper.
0 votes
rfarmer124, , 53226
Fri May 26, 2017
FLA typically 10K-12K increase in value and when you add a screened in enclosure maybe 17K-20K.....now of course if your in the high range homes over 300K typically those pools are much nicer and will increase the value more than moderate homes with pools
0 votes
Louvasquez.c…, Home Buyer, New York, NY
Thu May 25, 2017
In the Midwest, trying to sell a home with an outdoor winterized pool is detrimental.
However, showing of a pool that is in full operation with ALL the landscaping accrutements well into the season will help to garner an offer closer to the asking price.
0 votes
Peter and St…, Agent, Rhinebeck, NY
Thu May 25, 2017
In the Northeast a pool really does not increase or decrease a price or how fast a property sells, most of our clients do not want pools and a few do.
0 votes
Shelia Power, , Huntsville, AL
Tue May 23, 2017
I am a realtor in Alabama. I think pools are a great selling feature. As far as an appraisal value depends on what all comes with the pool. You usually can add about $10,000-$13,000 for a pool. You do have those clients that do not want the upkeep, but pools now are not that high maintenance unless you have an older pool. Hope this helps.
0 votes
AJ Hernandez, Mortgage Broker Or Lender, Hialeah, FL
Tue May 23, 2017
It really depends back in the days when it was acceptable for appraiser to speak with loan officers one explained it to me like this. As with most improvements it depends on what the market is doing for example, If you have 3 sales all without pools of similar properties and say two sales of similar properties that have a pool for only say $5k more then in the eyes of the market a pool is only worth $5k more even though in real life a pool obviously costs more than $5k.

However not all buyers need or want a pool, some feel it's an unnecessary expense to maintain, in some cases a pool can increase insurance premiums, some consider it dangerous so that may indirectly lower the offer price not to say that the home is worth less because of the pool but if the only buyer interested in the house truly does not like, need or want a pool they will not want to pay for it.

However from the seller point of view if you don't want a pool you can't say to the seller that the pool is not of value, some buyers use this strategy when they really do like the pool but sellers can usually see right thru that.

It's like when you buy a car and say you want leather seats but you don't want a sunroof, well usually these things come in a package from the manufacturer so although you may not want the sunroof or may not use it if you want the leather seats you have to decide to do I pay for them or not. I am NOT a realtor and currently only offer loans in Florida so I recommend you speak to an expert in your area.

Hope this helps, God Bless. Psalm 20:4
0 votes
CK, , New York, NY
Sat May 20, 2017
From my experience flipping homes in coastal Socal, where the temperature in summer is moderated by the effects in the ocean, a pool has no net effect on price and speed in which homes sell. We base the home value as having no adjustment.

For homes in Riverside county, or inland where it gets hot in summer, it does speed up the time it takes to sell the home and commands more of a premium as long as the pool is not solar to the point where there is no more yard space. We normally add $30K-$60K value to a home compared to homes that do not have a pool in the neighborhood.

Hope this helps.
0 votes
Mrbojangless…, Home Buyer, Independence, MO
Fri May 19, 2017
I live in the mid-west and have had a pool for over 25 years and if you take care of your pool and start it up in the spring and clean it out good every year the work is very little you just need to stay on it and not let it set or start to turn.
0 votes
Fastbreakpla…, Home Buyer, New London, CT
Fri May 19, 2017
It depends where you live. A pool is a huge liability in New England. whereas its a huge asset in Florida if enclosed with screen. In LA where the weather is good, it should be a asset as long as the pool is in good shape. The reason is because one can entertain around the pool's space thereby giving your house's lot more space to use.
0 votes
24khope, Home Buyer, Southbury, CT
Fri May 19, 2017
When my kids were young I would never consider it. Now they are much older yes but it's also a huge $ and lots of work soooo no don't want a pool. I think pools are boring.
0 votes
Boring? Not for me. I like sitting by the shimmering water day or night. Very relaxing. Add a drink and it becomes better, add music and company and it turns I to a party. Enjoy!
Flag Thu May 25, 2017
Edge.kathy, Home Buyer, New York, NY
Fri May 19, 2017
Agree with the geographical responses. I will not live in FL without a swimming pool...personal preference, of course
5 votes
42jeanne1204, Home Buyer, Saint Charles, MO
Fri May 19, 2017
Depends on geographical area. Where I live it probably brings down the homes value and makes it harder to market and sell.
3 votes
Scott Godzyk, Agent, Manchester, NH
Fri May 19, 2017
The bottom line is if you love pools, for pool lovers it is a must. If you do not like pools, it may leave the house off their list. Many believe it balances out for the increase in one type of buyer offsets by losing those who dont like pools. If you do love pools, it can increase your happiness having one. Pool lovers know they cost money and time to maintain but oh so worth it for me
2 votes
Amy S Lemley, Home Buyer, Belfast, ME
Fri May 19, 2017
I bought a house that happened to come with a pool. After 5 years with that money pit I am destroying it and filling it in. The advice I got from a realtor friend was that I would have to disclose to any potential buyer that it leaks. I don't want to deal with the disclosures and I don't want to keep spending money to repair and maintain a defective pool. I would never buy another house with a pool.
2 votes
George.zafir…, Home Buyer, Yonkers, NY
Thu May 18, 2017
Pools add value but by no means do you get what you paid for if you installed it personally. Appraisers will tell you the same. I live in Melville NY (Long Island) and pools are not frowned upon here even though they only have use about 1/3 of the year. I'm also a RE Agent so I speak from experience. Let the buyer decide themselves if they want to fill it. Stage your house to sell by making it look clean, clutter free, have curb appeal and the buyer seeing themselves in YOUR home by keeping things plain and blank canvas like. Don't spend big $$$ when selling unless it will keep your home from selling (leaky roof/cracked foundation/broken tiles etc)
2 votes
sech, Home Owner, Saint Augustine, FL
Thu May 18, 2017
According to appraisers I have talked to in the past, a pool does not add that much value to the price of the house, compared to the cost of it, when they are doing the appraisal. As far as buying, it depends on if you want a pool or not. When buying a home it is usually cheaper buying a home with a pool than putting one in latter. I don't think filling in the pool will give you added value, but may work to what you may want to do if you need the added space by filling it. It depends on your lifestyle. If you are thinking of reselling in the near future after buying it will depend on the area you are for resale with pools and the demand.
2 votes
A home with a pool will add about 10K more to price of the home. To put a pool in yourself, will cost @ 26K. So you're better off buying a home with a pool if you want one. We bought a home without a pool because we didn't want a pool but later decided we did so we had one put in.
Flag Fri May 19, 2017
Ian Brown, Home Buyer, Columbia, MD
Thu May 18, 2017
Hey aepdog I have a house for sale in Port St. Lucie. Being biased and I would say pool home is a big plus in south florida
5 votes
Mjpurk, Home Buyer, Englewood, TN
Thu May 18, 2017
People that buy a house with a pool want a pool so dont sell it to some moroon who dont want a pool
3 votes
Richard Stud…, Home Buyer, Blairsville, GA
Thu May 18, 2017
IT IS A LIABILITY, AND FILLING IN A POOL MAY HELP YOU SELL YOUR HOUSE.
0 votes
riffe4, Home Buyer, Myrtle Beach, SC
Thu May 18, 2017
Depending where your property is I believe adds value. I live on an island and 400' from ocean surrounded by weekly Rentals. So definitely adds value here.
2 votes
Richard Stud…, Home Buyer, Blairsville, GA
Thu May 18, 2017
ABSOLUTLEY NOT! PEOPLE DO NOT WANT EXTRA EXPENSE AND CONSTANT UPKEEP.
1 vote
Wrong. I wont even look at a house without a pool. Its too hot in the south to not have that feature. Having put a pool in my own yard many years ago, I dont want that hassle again. Have a pool, or Im not interested
Flag Fri May 19, 2017
James Mansfi…, Home Buyer, Fort Worth, TX
Thu May 18, 2017
Hi everyone,
I think a lot has been said here and I won't try too too top it. Having said that, I am a real eastate agent and real estate incestor in DFW, Texas. I can safely say this about DFW If you are above the 300,000 mark the property has a pool or the HOA community has several pools. That's just how it is. the larger planned communities figure the buy in is about 225,000 to 350,000 all have several pools and tennis courts. Many homes over 375,000 have a pool and a sport court or putting green in the yard. We average 200 days of sunshine and each summer we get half of august with multiple days above 101' pools are extremely common. As for adding or detracting value it's all about price point. Anything above 275,000 simply has a pool so the buyers simply expect it. The communities with planed pools simply charge HOA dues to maintain the community pools weather you use them or not.
2 votes
Thank You! Happy Closings!
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Msakimijones, Home Buyer, Voorhees, NJ
Thu May 18, 2017
I think that pools only appeal to pool people, so there is the possibility of missing a larger group of buyers.
2 votes
Elpmlp, Home Buyer, Wauseon, OH
Thu May 18, 2017
Since your questions deals directly with "selling"; pools are probably a negative except in warm around the year locations like the South and West. In new developments (anywhere) they may or may not add value depending on the cost of the homes - higher values attracting buyers that want more amenities.

That said, if you and your family want a pool in which to enjoy and entertain you should go for it if you can afford it. You'll probably want to use it for at least 10 years. After that you may be looking at costs to replace the liner and mechanics/filter, etc. Don't forget fence and deck maintenance costs too.
0 votes
shelli jones, Other Pro, Central, IN
Thu May 18, 2017
As an appraiser, I can safely say that it all depends on the market. If you are in a subdivision where many owners have pools, then a buyer seeking a property in that subdivision may also want the pool. If you are in an area where there are few pools, it could be a deterrent or simply have no rate of return. One cannot say that there should never be any added value for any feature or amenity. It is all very dependent upon other properties in the neighborhood. In addition, in many warmer climates, buyers seek properties with pools but in cooler climates, not so much. There are not hard line rules and "always add" or "always subtract" or "always do nothing" when it comes to this type of amenity. Totally dependent on the individual property and where it is located.
5 votes
G. Grube, Home Buyer, Clifford Township, PA
Thu May 18, 2017
When I was taking Real Estate courses, in appraisals, we were told that you should NOT add anything to a home's price for a pool. A pool adds no value. Given two equal homes, people will pay the same amount for a home without a pool as they will for an exact duplicate home with a pool.
It's about the buyer's preferences. There is a huge percentage of buyers who would prefer NOT to have a pool and would consider it a negative when buying a house.
1 vote
Not true in AZ
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
And I believe the opposite is also true. If a buyer wants a pool, he will likely choose to buy a home that already has a pool. We fixed up our whole backyard, with pool, spa, large patio, backyard bar, guest house, the works. The pool is the centerpiece of our backyard and I truly believe that if a buyer who wants a pool see's our backyard, they will choose our house over most others. Our guests all love it and I think the right buyer would too.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Missabby121, Home Buyer, New York, NY
Thu May 18, 2017
If I want a pool yes if I have no use for it it's added work
3 votes
Its.steve.ca…, Home Buyer, Pomona, CA
Thu May 18, 2017
I have lived in 4 homes with pools in So Cal, I would say the person buying the home that has a pool wants the pool. I will say that unless you will live in the home to at least 10yrs you will never realize the expense of a pool you build. If the pool is already in place all the better I would say the value of a pool when selling is marginal unless it's done over the top pool experience with slides, waterfalls and so on. I just sold my house in the inland Empire with in ground large pool and Jacuzzi and it sold in 3 days and we had 5 full price offers. Bit it depends on the hoising market in your town. I think filling in a pool is the most ridicules thing i heard to do with a pool.
3 votes
When we went house hunting in 2003 a pool was about 75% on our list. Because we had to travel more than two hours from where we lived we found realtors were wasting our day showing us properties they thought could be a quick sale and money in their pocket. After our third trip and changing realtors twice we gave up.We went to another company and let them also know the pool idea was 75% favor on our list and because of this and her weeding out homes we had no interest in we bought a home in three days of looking. I hate these realtors that don't listen thinking they know more than the buyers what is best for them. Since our purchase family members went with this realtor buying and selling two homes in the area. If you watch all these HGTV home search shows the realtors ask the buyers wants and how much they will spend then start showing properties above their max price like they never listen. Realtor does this with me and they are fired!
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
not when it needs over 15k worth of work with more to come
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Greta Fischer, Home Buyer, Mount Kisco, NY
Thu May 18, 2017
It depends on where the home is located. In the south yes, in the north, no.
3 votes
Palm Springs ...yes. Coast ...no.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
our son filled the money pit pool in Austin TX . they are pleased that it is gone.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Hi- I am getting ready to move from Conn to Florida and I DEFINITELY want a pool since the heat bothers me. So, why would I move to hot Florida? Because Connecticut is making it prohibitive to live and retire here now. :)
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Mike.lopez491, Home Buyer, Las Vegas, NV
Thu May 18, 2017
Liability & Restrictions kill my choice of having a pool
1 vote
Patricia Tha…, Home Buyer, Pleasant Hill, CA
Thu May 18, 2017
If you live in Northern California or Nevada a pool maybe a hard sell. Drought, high water prices and water usage restrictions can make particularly a large pool not so desirable.
In SoCal I would consult with your water district to see what the price of water is and if there are restrictions during drought times.
0 votes
Fitnesslvr1, Home Buyer, Phoenix, AZ
Thu May 18, 2017
I used to live in the Midwest and we owned a pool. I did enjoy it and didn't mind the maintenance. Now we live in Phoenix and bought a new home without one. We decided against putting a pool in because we pay HOA dues every month and our subdivision has two beautiful pools that I can use anytime. So why pay all the money to put one in, plus chemicals and cleaning it when I already have access and paying for one already.
2 votes
In our area in North Phoenix, Del Webb built a few communities where homeowners are entitled to their community center, with pool, fitness, blah, blah, for what looks to be a reasonable HOA fee if you use the facilities. Homes listed for sale usually include a bunch of photos of the community center. However - they keep adding new developments, but not additional facilities (honestly, it's great guns!). Our neighborhood is not part of the Del Webb development and I would say about half the homes have pools. If you're a full-time resident who owns their home (we have some rentals) - you want your pool!
Flag Tue May 23, 2017
When we retired to Phoenix from Chicago (where we never had a pool), I knew I not only wanted a pool (we had vacationed here for several years in summer), but I wanted my own pool. I couldn't picture myself bringing myself and whatever stuff to a community pool where I might not appreciate the company, paying the higher HOA. This is just me. We bought a house with an existing pool (and, yes, we invested in fixing up the pool and yard, which already had good bones), and we're not sorry.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Most people don't use community pools. Input in pools in 2 homes in communities with pools. Few people want to have to walk to a pool. That's in Palm Springs.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Eliot Malamud, Home Buyer, Norfolk, VA
Thu May 18, 2017
I am a water person and have owned two homes with pools. My current home only has a hot tub and when I move, my next home will have a pool. As such, I would be a home buyer who is looking for a home with an existing pool, or i I would settle for a home without a pool if the lot is perfectly situated for a pool. When I sold both my previous homes, the realtor, who didn't understand the mentality of pool owners, told me that people would not want to pay more for a pool, or would try to make me drop the price because of the pool, or since one of my homes was being sold in the winter, wanted me to put 10k in escrow in case the pool wasn't functional come spring. I said No, no, NO! I was not selling the home to the dozens of people who didn't want a pool. I was selling the pool to one person who absolutely wanted the pool and was willing to buy the pool at a fraction of the cost of installing a new pool.

In answer to the question, a house without a pool "may" sell quicker than a house with a pool at a same price to someone who doesn't especially want the pool, but given time a house with a pool will sell to a pool oriented buyer at a higher price.
1 vote
Sara.marshal…, Home Buyer, Mount Pleasant, SC
Thu May 18, 2017
Personally, I avoid houses with pools. We found the perfect house but it had a pool. My main reason, is I would never feel safe enough with toddlers and young children. We would also prefer the yard to be open.
2 votes
Usuck69, Home Buyer, Nokomis, FL
Thu May 18, 2017
Bsalconies, floor to ceiling windows glass enclosed showers and solar panels on the roof and pools add ZERO $ to the sale
2 votes
BUT if a home is in an area where many others don't have such upgrades and/or added amenities and a buyer wants to be in that area and sees those amenities in that area at a similar price to other homes nearby then the home with some or all of those extra features WILL sell more quickly and often for a moderately higher asking price than any of the "comps" in that area because buyers will feel like they're getting a lot more added value for their money.
Now that said, as a seller you will NOT get that investment money for adding those amenities back from the sale, especially if you're doing them in an attempt to set a higher asking price, but if you're doing them to enjoy the home more for a while then if they're still the current trend when you do decide to sell then that home will likely sell more quickly and for slightly more than if they hadn't been done.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Rex Baldwin, Home Buyer, Seattle, WA
Thu May 18, 2017
HI There,

I have a small business loaning money to builders and flippers. While in certain parts of the country (LA would be there) a good working pool that is new or newish does add value to the property, but as soon as there are any issues, it can be a $50K negative in buyer's minds. So if you are buying a house with an existing pool. You can probably get them buy a pool maintenance policy for 10 years or so, to insure the pool is going to stay a asset.

hope this helps,

Rex
1 vote
Mr. Baldwin,

I'm a contractor just starting out in the Flip business. I have been doing work for years for others that flip. Seeing I am extremely versatile in sooo many aspects of contracting, I figured I would try out flipping on my own. I would love to chat via maybe email, I'm sure you could enlighten me on a few topics I have questions about.
Dan
DanGETWIRED40@yahoo.com
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Joseph fiore…, Other Pro, Cinnaminson, NJ
Thu May 18, 2017
Its according where the home is located. In the warmer parts of the country, like Arizona, Southern Florida and Southern California a pool is an asset and adds value to the home. In the colder parts of the country, a pool may very well limit your buyer pool (not swimming pool) and limit your potential buyer, as some people simply don't want a pool
4 votes
I am in mid-Atlantic coast of FL. Homes for sale with inground pools & screen enclosures are priced at $30,000 more than the same house without a pool, regardless of size, shape, & other pool complex amenities. Homes with large above ground pools tastefully done with surrounding multi level decking & landscaping, usually sell for same amt. as same house with no pool. Before discounting purchasing a home with an above ground pool, consider these 4 major advantages in FL: - $5K vs $35K to install; larger, as 14K - 18K gal vs 10K gallons typically; not property taxed; not accessible by snakes. Both can be made equally secure. And of course, an above ground pool can be taken down.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Warrene, Home Buyer, Old Fort, NC
Thu May 18, 2017
As it has been said, it all depends on the buyer. I had an in-the-ground pool for 7 years and love it. I had the deepest part only 6 feet, I have extended my season by installing a solar heater and the water is in the high 70's to the end of Sept and into Oct. As far as adding value, I don't think it has any effect.
2 votes
Debrageist, Home Buyer, Apple Valley, CA
Thu May 18, 2017
My real estate agent told me that it just depends on the buyer. A pool does not add
value to the property.
1 vote
Marianneeg, Home Buyer, Neshanic Station, NJ
Thu May 18, 2017
In Florida, especially in southern Florida, it is EXTREMELY difficult to sell a home without a pool. In NJ, where we lived before, it really was more of a balancing of customer needs/wants.
1 vote
Cathleendesr…, Home Seller, Andover, CT
Thu May 18, 2017
We have a saltwater in ground pool in New England and could not imagine living without it. It's the reason we did not sell and put on an addition.
1 vote
Art Welch, Agent, Buckeye, AZ
Thu May 18, 2017
Really depends, Age and condition as well as design of a pool will add or detract from value, Price range also, a higher end home with an outstanding pool back yard will always get much more than without. A 1960's home with a pool that looks like 1960 will get much less as the pool will become part of a list of remodeling costs. Be careful you must fill in a pool the right way or you will end up with a sink hole for a back yard.
2 votes
Phillip, , Dallas, TX
Thu May 18, 2017
This very much depends on what is typical for your neighborhood. If most of the houses in the neighborhood have pools, it could be a detriment not to have one. That said, in Dallas and Salt Lake City where I do most of my business, pools are not as popular in most neighborhoods and I have many buyers who specifically desire not to have a pool - so it can actually be a detriment to consumers wanting a low maintenance home. That said, I would LOVE to have one - but I am not the average consumer.
1 vote
Janet, Home Buyer, 17601
Thu May 18, 2017
An in-ground pool always looks so peaceful and inviting but now that I'm up in years, I'd prefer to buy in a community that has a pool for the residents. We had one when my kids were younger and we all loved it.
1 vote
Rcz58z, Home Buyer, Greenwood, SC
Thu May 18, 2017
when we built our house, we had a large pool put in a few years later.. for the first 10 years, it required little maintenance, however, the past few years, I've replaced 2 pumps, can't keep the algae off the walls, rebuilt the hayward sweep and can't get the calcium off the tiles at the top.
My kids are grown and gone, wife and i don't swim much.. but my Lab dog loves the pool!!
if i had it to do over again, I would not get a pool as i'm doing the maintenance.. we live in Ca.
2 votes
Bottomryder, Home Buyer, New York, NY
Thu May 18, 2017
If u like swimming I think a pool would help my decision to purchase the home , in my case I don't like a pool or the work to maintain it & pay for the maintenance, but if I liked the house I would buy it anyway
1 vote
Judy Jobin, Agent, Flower Mound, TX
Thu May 18, 2017
I am a Realtor in the Dallas area. It think it really depends on where you live and the climate, whether you have kids or not, and whether a pool is on your want list or not! I work with Buyers and they either want a pool, or they do not want the extra work of having one. When I show a well designed backyard with a pool and outdoor kitchen, it is highly desirable by those who want a pool. However, a Seller will NOT get their full value back if they put in the pool, but it does add value to the home. We live in Texas and bought our house 10 years ago vs. 2 other homes and the pool was the main reason. We looked into adding a pool at our previous home so decided to move instead and find a home that already had a pool. My kids were younger and even though they use it less as they got older, we have enjoyed it so much! We have many parties and it feels like a 'staycation' to have access to water so close by. Its HOT here in the Summer so we get a ton of use out of it, almost year round. My husband does not like getting the leaves out after a storm or in the Fall, but all in all, it was worth moving for and was an asset for us.
7 votes
Pkorahais, Home Buyer, Queens, NY
Thu May 18, 2017
It all depends on the price of the home and of course location. Above ground pools rarely add anything and usually need to be removed before a sale, inground pools on higher value homes def have some impact on sales price. As always it all comes down to the buyer.
0 votes
I had a client who, when I showed him the listing with a new "above ground pool", told me, tell them to start taking it down, then I will look at the property. He also wanted a lawn that he could cut with the scissors! Some prefer above ground because they are easier to get rid of when no longer used. They also don't want the Jersey $1,000 tax that comes with in ground without adding any value. It is strictly the choice of the buyer.
Flag Thu May 18, 2017
Donald Brewer, Home Buyer, Shannon, MS
Thu May 18, 2017
We put in a huge 18'x43'x30' L-Shaped pool a couple of years ago. Instead of salt water or traditional chlorine, we elected to go with a FROG mineral pool system that requires very little maintenance and never had to winterize it. In fact, we leave it running year round. It may or may not add any additional value but we really don't care as long as we're having a great time building memories in it.
4 votes
Tierralucero, Home Buyer, El Mirage, AZ
Thu May 18, 2017
In Arizona typically yes they do depending on square footage, location of the home and to a lot of people the appearance of the house can make or break the sale.
0 votes
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